I'm looking for documentation for a CR90 receiver

HA3KGX

Active Member
The filter on the card is a 600 Hz filter in the IF amplifier signal path, which is
switched in when using the two narrowest bandwidth options.

Both Telefunken and RFT filter designations use the letter E (= Einseitenband) for SSB filters, and
Z (= Zenter or "symmetrical") for a narrow filter.


Hi!

I hope I'm not boring :)

The TD90 has revived, it has improved pushbuttons, I have replaced a battery, bad foil capacitors, it turns on and off nicely responds to everything.

Can it be connected to the receiver? Is it controlled by the receiver's frequency? Unfortunately, I don't understand your control without a drawing, I don't have any pin assignments for its connectors ...
 

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SM0AOM

Well-Known Member
The control protocols differ between the CR90 and the TD90, as the front panels map
control information in different ways.

Also, it is likely that the baud rates for the serial data links are different.

Most ARTRAC-modified CR90 uses 1600 Baud signalling with 8 data bits, 1 stop bit and odd parity in order to handle fast scanning requirements, but the TD90 used in the transmitter used the original 200 Baud.

The pin-outs for the remote control board in the CR90 are identical, the control link is an opto-isolated V.28 interface, and the back-signalling link uses either V.28 or open-collector TTL levels.

Back-signalling, which is identical to the data used for updating the front panel,
is done as with a format where the data address uses the MSB nibble and the actual data
is contained in the LSB nibble.

From memory, the data map used in the CR90 looks like this:

MSB LSB
0 channel number LSD (0-9)
1 channel number MSD (0-9)
2 1 Hz digit (0-9)
3 10 Hz digit (0-9)
4 100 Hz digit (0-9)
5 1 kHz digit (0-9)
6 10 kHz digit (0-9)
7 100 kHz digit (0-9)
8 1 MHz digit (0-9)
9 10 MHz digit (0-2)
A Test meter value (0-F)
B Device address (usually F)
C Bandwidth/50 ohms/Hi-Z (0-9)
D MGC/AGC (0-9)
E Mode/20 dB attenuator (0-9)
F Test meter function (0-9)

TD90:

MSB LSB
0 channel number LSD (0-9)
1 channel number MSD (0-9)
2 100 Hz digit (0-9)
3 1 kHz digit (0-9)
4 10 kHz digit (0-9)
5 100 kHz digit (0-9)
6 1 MHz digit (0-9)
7 10 MHz digit (0-2)
8 Last used function (0-9)
9 Test meter value (0-F)
A Device address (usually F)
B Mapping of status LEDs (0-F)
C Test meter function (1-7)
D Mapping of Hi/Lo power and PA off/on LEDs (0-9)
E Mapping of Simplex/Duplex and MOX on/off LEDs (0-9)
F Mode (1-F)

Pin-out for the remote control board 25-pin connector X2:

1 common for V.28 (strap to ground)
2 TTL remote control message, strap to 4
3 serial status output TTL
4 TTL remote control input
9 ground
11 serial status output V.28

Hope this helps.
 
Last edited:

HA3KGX

Active Member
The control protocols differ between the CR90 and the TD90, as the front panels map
control information in different ways.

Also, it is likely that the baud rates for the serial data links are different.

Most ARTRAC-modified CR90 uses 1600 Baud signalling with 8 data bits, 1 stop bit and odd parity in order to handle fast scanning requirements, but the TD90 used in the transmitter used the original 200 Baud.

The pin-outs for the remote control board in the CR90 are identical, the control link is an opto-isolated V.28 interface, and the back-signalling link uses either V.28 or open-collector TTL levels.

Back-signalling, which is identical to the data used for updating the front panel,
is done as with a format where the data address uses the MSB nibble and the actual data
is contained in the LSB nibble.

From memory, the data map used in the CR90 looks like this:

MSB LSB
0 channel number LSD (0-9)
1 channel number MSD (0-9)
2 1 Hz digit (0-9)
3 10 Hz digit (0-9)
4 100 Hz digit (0-9)
5 1 kHz digit (0-9)
6 10 kHz digit (0-9)
7 100 kHz digit (0-9)
8 1 MHz digit (0-9)
9 10 MHz digit (0-2)
A Test meter value (0-F)
B Device address (usually F)
C Bandwidth/50 ohms/Hi-Z (0-9)
D MGC/AGC (0-9)
E Mode/20 dB attenuator (0-9)
F Test meter function (0-9)

TD90:

MSB LSB
0 channel number LSD (0-9)
1 channel number MSD (0-9)
2 100 Hz digit (0-9)
3 1 kHz digit (0-9)
4 10 kHz digit (0-9)
5 100 kHz digit (0-9)
6 1 MHz digit (0-9)
7 10 MHz digit (0-2)
8 Last used function (0-9)
9 Test meter value (0-F)
A Device address (usually F)
B Mapping of status LEDs (0-F)
C Test meter function (1-7)
D Mapping of Hi/Lo power and PA off/on LEDs (0-9)
E Mapping of Simplex/Duplex and MOX on/off LEDs (0-9)
F Mode (1-F)

Pin-out for the remote control board 25-pin connector X2:

1 common for V.28 (strap to ground)
2 TTL remote control message, strap to 4
3 serial status output TTL
4 TTL remote control input
9 ground
11 serial status output V.28

Hope this helps.
Hi!

Thanks, in the rack from which I took them out did I see as if the CR90 and TD90 were connected to the TCU90?
This unit also has a speaker, switch, cw key handset etc. connector .... This speaker doesn't want to work at all, a block sketch should be what it was connected to.

I hope I don’t ask too much, unfortunately no one here with us understands these radios, it’s hard enough!

Alexander
 

SM0AOM

Well-Known Member
Usually, the audio paths to and from the TCU90 go through the ARTRAC units, enabling automatic SSB calls to be set-up.

It is further very likely that both the CR90 and the TD90 require the proper interconnect cables to and from the ARTRAC in order to work properly.

The TD90 can drive whatever amplifier that requires 100 mW of drive, and has some form of servo-tuning mechanism.

There are coarse-setting frequency information available in the PA interface connector X2 on card 35, as well as status and tune/tune complete signals.

Signals in the PA interface that are decoded and displayed on the TD90 front panel are:

RF output
Tuning in progress
PA state on/off

which are directly derived from the SSA400 or SSA1000 amplifiers.

Other amplifiers need an interface; I have designed interfaces for two generations of Telefunken 30 and 100 kW amplifiers, two generations of Collins 10 kW amplifiers and finally 25 years ago for the Rockwell-Collins 1000 W and 2500 W HF-80 and Spectrum 2000 solid-state amplifiers.
 

HA3KGX

Active Member
Usually, the audio paths to and from the TCU90 go through the ARTRAC units, enabling automatic SSB calls to be set-up.

It is further very likely that both the CR90 and the TD90 require the proper interconnect cables to and from the ARTRAC in order to work properly.

The TD90 can drive whatever amplifier that requires 100 mW of drive, and has some form of servo-tuning mechanism.

There are coarse-setting frequency information available in the PA interface connector X2 on card 35, as well as status and tune/tune complete signals.

Signals in the PA interface that are decoded and displayed on the TD90 front panel are:

RF output
Tuning in progress
PA state on/off

which are directly derived from the SSA400 or SSA1000 amplifiers.

Other amplifiers need an interface; I have designed interfaces for two generations of Telefunken 30 and 100 kW amplifiers, two generations of Collins 10 kW amplifiers and finally 25 years ago for the Rockwell-Collins 1000 W and 2500 W HF-80 and Spectrum 2000 solid-state amplifiers.
Hi!

Thanks! There’s also an SSA400 amp, which will be a next chapter, all pretty slowly step by step. Nearly 40-year-old devices, I attached a picture from the bottom of the rack.
 

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HA3KGX

Active Member
With me, the ARTRAC unit makes a continuous beeping sound, its keyboard is lit but it doesn't respond to anything unfortunately
 

SM6OID

Well-Known Member
Hi!
Glad you found the manual!
I have some SRT stuff that I use frequently, TD90+SSA400 and CTD500+SSA400 plus CR91 and CR90
 

HA3KGX

Active Member
Hi!
Glad you found the manual!
I have some SRT stuff that I use frequently, TD90+SSA400 and CTD500+SSA400 plus CR91 and CR90
The ARTRAC unit came to life, a module was missing. Can you remotely control both the transmitter and receiver, but someone might not have the error code table?

Thanks
 

SM0AOM

Well-Known Member
Yes, the ARTRAC stores all frequencies and modes, and also controls both the receiver and transmitter frequencies.

However, in order to use the ARTRAC control unit, the documentation is most likely necessary.
 

HA3KGX

Active Member
Yes, the ARTRAC stores all frequencies and modes, and also controls both the receiver and transmitter frequencies.

However, in order to use the ARTRAC control unit, the documentation is most likely necessary.
I'm going to read it today, but I don't think it will be in it ... I have a good idea if there is a sound if I turn on the VOICE ON function on the ARTRAC unit? Because the speaker of the lower unit does not sound, it has a key handset, etc. connector. If I connect a speaker directly to the receiver, it works, so the system has not yet been able to resolve the sound.
 

HA3KGX

Active Member
Hi!


This is the current situation, compared to the fact that in the beginning nothing worked already this is a great success. But how next? :)


VIDEO
 

HA3KGX

Active Member
Yes, the ARTRAC stores all frequencies and modes, and also controls both the receiver and transmitter frequencies.

However, in order to use the ARTRAC control unit, the documentation is most likely necessary.
Hi!

I have a question, there is 3 eeprom on the B10925 3011 panel in the ARTRAC unit. Does anyone have this? Would you read the contents of the eeproms to me? I would really need it, thanks in advance for the answers
 

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HA3KGX

Active Member
Hi!

ARTRAC is set, my question would be, should the speaker marked with an arrow sound continuously when it is max volume on and turned on? I can't sound at max volume if I put my ear in there I can only hear the radio very very quietly. Does anyone have such a unit? How should this work?

Thanks!

Srt13.jpg
 
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